From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Richard and Pat
Posts: 444
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2018 2:44 pm
Location: Biggleswade

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Richard and Pat » Mon Jul 06, 2020 6:28 am

Well done Dave.
Let me know if you have something for the next issue of Trifles please.

peakrock
Posts: 85
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Mon Jul 06, 2020 8:23 am

Thanks Richard, I'm sure I can find something else to drivel on about for Trifles..... :P

Cheers Dave

Donaldo
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:58 pm
Location: Dumfries and Galloway

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Donaldo » Tue Jul 07, 2020 7:05 am

The Brembo 4 pot calipers look amazing and should have great stopping power. Would you know the model number please? I imagine BMW, Aprilia etc all use the same. Wonder if rear would need to be different?
Keep up the good work as you are doing a great job.

peakrock
Posts: 85
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:56 am

I had the same brake calipers on my previous Triking and they were very effective - I was really glad to have them on the Yorkshire meet...! As well as good stopping power they are able to dissipate heat build up more quickly than a caliper with a single piston each side so less chance of brake fade.. I don't know the exact part number (Alan could probably help you there) but they are fitted to quite a large range of bikes it seems. Mine came off a BMW S1000rr via eBay.
As far as the rear caliper goes you will need one that provides a handbrake function and I've gone for the large "car type" one that Alan sells as it's rugged and built for the harsh environment low down on the Triking back wheel. It's big and heavy and can't easily be used with the car type rear wheel conversions as it won't fit inside the rim. Some owners prefer the smaller rear caliper but I think pad wear is appreciably higher, however it does reduce the unsprung weight of the rear suspension which is incredibly heavy for the size - it must account for a 1/4 of the overall Triking weight by the feel of it..!

peakrock
Posts: 85
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:18 am

Whilst we're on the subject of brakes I couldn't resist posting a picture of the front wheel with disc attached...some serious brakes with this combination...
Front_disk.jpg

Donaldo
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:58 pm
Location: Dumfries and Galloway

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Donaldo » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:48 am

Thanks for the detail on brakes.

That disc is awesome

Spaniard
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:06 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Spaniard » Sat Jul 11, 2020 3:08 pm

I like the Type 4 pedals. Are they pretty straight forward installation? I was thinking about them as the standard supplied gas pedal had to much lateral slop for my liking. I have a LHD Triking so I should have a little more room to install them.

Ivan

peakrock
Posts: 85
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Sun Jul 12, 2020 10:11 am

The Type 4 pedal box is wider than the Type 3 Triking fabricated one and a signicant amount of modification was necessary to get it to work in my Type 3:
I had to cut a small section out between the accelerator and brake pedal pedals to reduce the overall width of the box.
The brake pedal uses the same type of balance bar for the master cylinders and lined up ok with the cylinder holes in the bulkhead but it was necessary to use extenders on the push rods as the pedal box had to be set back a bit.
The clutch on the Type 3 is cable whereas the pedal box is designed for a hydraulic clutch - I got round this by fabricating a short lever arm and bolting it to the pedal shaft which fortunately, are rectangular bar sections. I got the dimensions for the arm length or throw from a Triking fabricated Type 3 pedal. I also had to make a hole in the upper part of the pedal box for the cable to run through.
The accelerator is also cable operated, I had to make a long arm for this and bolt it to the shaft and used part of an old bicycle brake lever to make a rotating cable nipple holder (or is it called a barrel?)
The pedal box works well and everything operates as I would want, though being a Type 3, it's not exactly a roomy area for the feet.
Triking Pedals.jpg
The Type 4 pedal box may fit in your LHD Type 3 without being narrowed but although that side of the tunnel is wider there is a key difference between the right and left hand sides. On the right hand side the tunnel is straight to accomodate the front prop bearing and universal joint which gives a fixed width of around 9 inches, on the left hand side the tunnel flares out such that it's width rapidly expands back from the bulkhead. This means you may need to set the pedal box further back from the bulkhead than you'd like if you don't want to saw it up.

I would also say that doing all this work with the body in situ is going to be much harder and if it's just the accelerator pedal you're unhappy with I would be inclined to remove it and re-engineer it - maybe have it bushed or refabricated so it's more of a precision fit...

Dave

peakrock
Posts: 85
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:17 am

Continuing the work on the rear end I've started assembling the new tail section. The rear lights are repro Cadillac, sourced from the US and surprisingly well made compared with some of the repro stuff you get. They are quite vulnerable so are lightly bolted to the tail so they can be replaced if necessary.

Next to the rear lights the silencer is playing its' part in setting the theme.. It's a Harley Softail Pan Tail modern replica, sourced from Germany. It's quite well made but came with no brackets or fixings of any kind. Once again, Al's engineering skills were requisitioned and he came up with a great pair of substantial brackets in stainless steel. I'm not sure the MSVA inspector will like these silencers as the fin edge is only lightly rounded but I can always put some standard Guzzi silencers on for the test.
Tail-Section_s.jpg
Higher up, you can see the luggage rack has clamps etc on it, this is going to sit on my fabricated frame underneath and because of this and my one off tail section it needs "bespoke" feet and brackets, guess who is going to make the feet for me.....
Finally, the number plate mounting is one of those things I kept pushing out of my mind but eventually it had to be faced so I think I'll hang it off a short pair of arms from the luggage rack as then the tail shape isn't obscured too much..

westendguzzi
Posts: 340
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2018 7:30 pm
Location: Huntingdonshire

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by westendguzzi » Mon Jul 13, 2020 6:01 pm

Stunnng work Dave, keep it up!

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