From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

peakrock
Posts: 75
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Mon Jun 01, 2020 8:39 am

It seems I timed building my second Triking just right - the lockdown has meant plenty of time to spend in the workshop though I need a break from time to time so it doesn't feel like a 9 - 5 day job!

I've made things harder for myself by going the bespoke or "one-off" route which all adds a lot of time to certain aspects of the build but then this could be my last Triking build. Anyway, here are some pics of the build.
New-Triking-2.jpg
This was taken several weeks ago, I've included it because it shows how the Type 4 collapsible steering/universal joints fit in the Type 3 quite nicely. Also of note are the remote brake cylinder reservoirs.
New-Triking-1.jpg
This was taken yesterday, as you can see it's fairly busy under the bonnet now mainly due to using an older California as a donor which has a big ECU and lots of associated ignition components etc. I also like to relay and fuse everything which means more components and wiring. You may spot the trailer socket on the mini bulkhead - this goes to the rear lights and means if I use an A frame for towing I can easily plug the Triking rear lights into the Towing vehicle. The glovebox has been shortened to allow room for the ECU part of the loom and also has a USB socket, 12v socket and internal light. It's easy to remove so I can gain access to the passenger footwell - my battery is at the front of the footwell behind a removable panel. Part of the wiring loom is from the donor bike but most of it I created from scratch. You can also see the Type 4 pedals on the drivers side.
New-Triking-3.jpg
My first and probably only attempt at Burr Walnut veneer on a dashboard. It's Araldited to an aluminum dashboard but has several joins as the veneer sheets are not big enough to over in one go. It has about 16 coats of clear lacquer and has some small blemishes but mostly looks ok. As you can see, lots of warning lights - these are CNC aluminum with LED's from Car Builder Solutions - I rather like them. The speedo and rev counter are from the bike and I have a soft spot for the old Lucas style paddle switches. Also spot the Umbrella handbrake, sourced from a Ford Ranger - it works really well.

So that's where I am at the moment - now doing the rear end with twin petrol tanks and my fancy tail section..!

colinc
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:02 pm
Location: Cambridgeshire

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by colinc » Mon Jun 01, 2020 11:43 am

Well done on the build. I especially like what you've done with the Burr Walnut. I had considered doing something similar on my type 4 but decided I was probably beyond my patience and/or skill!

Richard and Pat
Posts: 412
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2018 2:44 pm
Location: Biggleswade

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Richard and Pat » Mon Jun 01, 2020 8:03 pm

An excellent job in progress, impressive.

westendguzzi
Posts: 320
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2018 7:30 pm
Location: Huntingdonshire

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by westendguzzi » Mon Jun 01, 2020 9:18 pm

Superb work. Bespoke items certainly take a lot more time. Took me nearly 2 years to build Daisy with front wheel drive.
Hope the wiper motor isn't going to foul on the ECU.

peakrock
Posts: 75
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Fri Jun 05, 2020 5:24 pm

Some owners might be interested in the front suspension setup on my Type 3 build; it's mostly the high performance suspension option which utilises the Hagon gas shocks but which has been modified to utilise the Type 4 hub upright with the longer stub axle, this allows for the wider Type 4 wire wheels. Braking is provided by 4 pot Brembo calipers sourced off a BMW motorcycle. Please note the suspension as shown in the picture has only been loosely assembled to check brake hose positioning etc and will have all joints properly tightened..!
Front-Suspension.jpg

peakrock
Posts: 75
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:13 am

The time finally arrived when putting the engine and gearbox in was sensible - it's sometimes tempting to do jobs like this early on as there's more to show for a couple of hours work than filing a small piece of metal that will be hidden away somewhere! So, quite a satisfying day - the chain block hoist makes light work of the engine and the chassis trolley makes it so easy to move things around as you guide the engine in...
Engine_in2.jpg
Here is an overall view of how it looks at present, the wheels are still off as it makes it much easier to get to things in the engine bay..
Engine_in1.jpg

Richard and Pat
Posts: 412
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2018 2:44 pm
Location: Biggleswade

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Richard and Pat » Mon Jun 29, 2020 12:20 pm

Looking good Dave.

Berglind
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Dec 05, 2019 8:15 am
Location: Vaxjo, Sweden

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by Berglind » Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:02 am

Inspiring, looks good!

peakrock
Posts: 75
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 4:52 pm
Location: Wreningham

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by peakrock » Sun Jul 05, 2020 7:34 pm

Thanks for the kind comments....

If you've read this months "Trifles" you'll have seen I decided to have twin fuel tanks, (I have notions of long distance travel in this Triking and more fuel capacity would seem useful). Following on from the article I did the final fitting of the tanks over the weekend and this photo shows how they look.
Fitted-fuel-tanks.jpg
The nearside tank has a section removed when compared to a standard tank to allow the rear wheel spindle to be removed with the tank in situ. On the swing arm there is a threaded pin which the brake caliper plate slots into which has an allen key head. It's much easier to remove the rear wheel if this is undone but it's not possible to get an alley key in it with the tank there. To get round this I welded a small steel bar to the head of the threaded pin such that I can undo it quite easily with no tools. When tightened up the bar is parallel to the swing arm and can be locked in position with a substantial cable tie.

The rear wheel is rim spoked - you can see there is a lot of triangulation in the spokes which makes it strong, the rear tyre is a motorcycle one with a large contact patch, I'll see how it wears....

The rear spring/shocks are Hagon gas filled ones which have a larger spring diameter than the ones I had off the bike so careful tank positioning and brake hose/brake cable routing was necessary but it all fits.

The fuel filler is now on the rear of the shell rather than the removable rear section and is a great example of how a casual decision to move something can result in hours...and hours.... of extra work. It was necessary to fabricate a mini bulkhead attached to the main rear bulkhead to ensure that if the hose from the filler to the tank leaked it wouldn't go inside the cockpit, lots of complex angles and shapes and it all needs to be sealed to the rear bulkhead etc...

You may also have spotted the steel construction above the rear wheel, this is a cantilevered bracket that enables the luggage rack load to be taken on the chassis rather than the fibreglass tail section, it also helps support the rear tail section. Some minor finishing off like supporting the fuel return hose and a rear mudguard to be fitted but complete enough to be on its' wheels soon. The shell is just resting on at the moment.

EricStarmer
Posts: 226
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 3:51 pm
Location: USA

Re: From a workshop in rural Norfolk...

Post by EricStarmer » Sun Jul 05, 2020 8:12 pm

Awesome work, Dave - I love to see other people's mods !

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